Curriculum Goals

  • Provide learning experiences based on measurable objectives for the education of general surgeons during their residency.
  • Integrate principles of basic sciences with clinical experiences.
  • Promote a broad understanding of the role of surgery and its interaction with other medical disciplines such as general medicine, psychiatry, and pediatrics.
  • Provide progressive responsibility from initial patient care to complete patient management.
  • Foster effective interdisciplinary collaborative relationships.
  • Provide surgical residents with the ability to function as teachers and consultants.
  • Foster continuing education to promote lifelong individual initiative and creative scholarships.
  • Prepare surgical residents to use research technology and skills in conducting studies that assist in solving surgical problems.
  • Develop professional leadership and management skills.
  • Promote understanding of the economic, legal, and social challenges of contemporary and future surgery.

Curriculum Objectives

The objectives of a curriculum describe the desired changes that occur in the behavior of learners when goals of the curriculum have been achieved. These objectives are expressed as outcomes and are related to one or more of the competencies or attitudes described as outcomes of professional education.

Thus, objectives for the curriculum in surgery specify what the resident should know, be able to do, or have an attitude about.

At the completion of training, the resident should be able to:

  • Manage surgical disorders based on a thorough knowledge of basic and clinical science.
  • Demonstrate the appropriate skills in those surgical techniques required of a qualified surgeon.
  • Demonstrate the use of critical thinking when making decisions affecting the life of a patient and the
    patient's family.
  • Make sound ethical and legal judgments appropriate for a qualified surgeon.
  • Collaborate effectively with colleagues and other health professionals.
  • Teach and share knowledge with colleagues, residents, students, and other healthcare providers.
  • Teach patients and their families about the patient's health needs.
  • Demonstrate acceptance of the value of life-long learning as a necessary prerequisite to maintaining surgical knowledge and skill.
  • Demonstrate a commitment to scholarly pursuits through the conduct and evaluation of research.
  • Demonstrate leadership in the management of complex programs and organizations.
  • Provide cost-effective care to surgical patients and families within the community.
  • Respect the religious needs of patients and their families and provide surgical care in accordance with those needs.

Sample Rotation Schedule

Months PGY-1 PGY-2 PGY-3 PGY-4 PGY-5
1 Trauma
Surg Onc/MIS
Bariatric/ENT
ICU
CT/Breast
Night Float
2 Vascular
Night Float
Night Float
Vascular
Trauma
3 Colorectal/
MIS/General
ICU
Peds Surg
Colorectal/
MIS/General
Colorectal/
MIS/General
4 Night Float
Night Float
Surg Onc/MIS
Bariatric/ENT
Night Float
Colorectal/
MIS/General
5 CT/Breast
Trauma
Vascular/
Transplant
Emergency/
General
Vascular
6 Night Float
Vascular
Transplant/
Trauma
Trauma
Vascular
7 Trauma
Vascular
Vascular
Night Float
Surg Onc/MIS/
Bariatric/ENT
8 CT/Breast
Peds Surg
Night Float
Colorectal/
MIS/General
CT/Breast
9 Surg Onc/MIS
Bariatric/ENT
Colorectal/
MIS/General
Peds Surg
Night Float
Surg Onc/MIS/
Bariatric/ENT
10 ICU
Emergency/
General
Colorectal/MIS
General
Peds Surg
Emergency/
General
11 CT/Breast
Surg Onc/MIS
Bariatric/ENT
Vascular
Trauma
Emergency/
General
12 Night Float
Plastic Surgery
Trauma
Surg Onc/MIS/
Bariatric/ENT
Surg Onc/MIS/
Bariatric/ENT
13 Trauma
ICU
Surg Onc/MIS
Bariatric/ENT
Colorectal/MIS
General
Colorectal/MIS
General

Call Schedule

Memorial Health University Medical Center's department of surgery uses a night-float system to cover overnight calls. The night-float team covers all new and established surgical and trauma inpatients overnight.

Residents typically spend two months each year on night float, where they gain significant experience caring for acutely ill patients and performing a variety of bedside and operating room procedures.

The PGY1 residents work six 12-hour overnight shifts, Sunday through Friday, with Saturday nights off.

The PGY2 and PGY3 residents work six 12-hour shifts, Saturday through Thursday, with Friday nights off.

The PGY4 and PGY5 residents work five 12-hours shifts, Monday through Thursday, as well as one 24-hour shift on Sunday, with Fridays and Saturdays off.

The night-float residents also assist the weekend rounding teams seeing floor patients on Saturdays and Sundays prior to leaving.

Residents that are not on the night-float rotation cover in-house call on the weekends. All residents not on the night-float rotation typically have every other weekend free of all clinical duties (from Friday afternoon until Monday morning).

The weekends on-call for PGY1 residents consist of one of the following shifts:

  • one five-hour shift on Friday night and one 16-hour shift on Saturday night OR
  • two 12-hour day shifts, one on Saturday and one on Sunday.

The weekends on-call for PGY2 and PGY3 consist of one of the following shifts:

  • one 24-hour shift on Saturday OR
  • or two 12-hour shifts, one on Friday night and one on Sunday day.

The weekends on-call for PGY4 and PGY5 consist of one of the following shifts:

  • one 12-hour shift on Friday night OR
  • or one 24-hour shift on Saturday.

All of the above shifts are compliant with the new ACGME resident work hours restrictions for all PGY levels.

Procedure Volume

The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and the Residency Review Committee for surgery has established guidelines outlining the minimum number of operative procedures and general content areas of general surgery.

The volume and variety of operative experience at Memorial Health University Medical Center provide a balanced experience in each of the essential content areas of general surgery.

These defined categories are head and neck, breast, skin and soft tissues, alimentary tract, abdomen, vascular system, endocrine system, management of trauma/critical care, emergency surgery, and transplantation.

The program and faculty take into account individual capability and rate of progress to ensure sufficient operative experience to produce qualified and competent surgeons.

The following tables depict numbers and types of operative cases performed by our graduating residents in comparison to the ACGME requirements:

Procedure Volume by 2021 Chief Residents Compared to ACGME Requirements

Operative Procedure Required by ACGME Chief A Chief B Chief C Chief D Chief E
Liver 5 11 10 11 8 10
Pancreas 5 8 12 11 5 16
Laparoscopic –B 100 190 198 210 229 185
Pediatric 20 63 48 116 74 42
Vascular 50 119 167 140 83 187

Graduating Resident Avg. Operative Experience 2009-2019 Total Major Cases

Year Total Cases
2009 1238
2010 1360
2011 1079
2012 1157
2013 1135
2014 1393
2015 1050
2016 924
2017 1076
2018 1080
2019 1182

Destinations of General Surgery Chief Residents

Chief Year 2020–2021 Cases Initial Post-Graduate Position
Stacey Bowlds, MD 1,086 Hospital employed at Lake Cumberland Regional Hospital in Somerset, Kentucky
Timothy Finnegan, MD 1,082 MIS fellowship at the University of Alabama program (1 yr.)
Krista Miller, MD 1,179 Group practice -Wenatchee Valley Medical Group (Wenatchee, Washington)
Christina Munford, MD 1,067 Group Practice (Surgical Associates of West Florida, Safety Harbor, FL)
Lynn Nguyen, MD 1,243 Group Practice (Billings Clinic in Billings, Montana)
R. Tyler Cowart, MD 1,356 Colon and Rectal Surgery Fellowship at Orlando Health in Orlando, FL (1 year)
Aaron Kirby, MD 1,061 Private Practice at Sebasticook Valley Hospital in Pittsfield, Maine
Andrew Schwemmer, MD 1,143 Transition to Surgery Fellowship (Mastery in General Surgery Program at St. Vincent's Health System (Riverside) in Jacksonville, FL (North Florida Surgeons) (1 year)
Kristine So, MD 1,059 Vascular Surgery Fellowship at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio (2 years)
Ashley Thompson, MD 1,200 Acute Care Fellowship at the University of Florida in Gainesville, FL (2 years)
Jo Cooke-Barber, MD 1,027 Pediatric Vascular Malformations and Pediatric Surgical Oncology Fellowship at Cincinnati Children's Hospital (Cincinnati, Ohio) (2 years)
Samuel Corey, MD 1,051 Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery fellowship at University Louisville (3 years)
Thomas Gianis, Jr., MD 1,312 Vascular Fellowship at the University of Virginia School of Medicine (2 years)
Craig Smith, MD 1,279 MIS fellowship at the University of Indiana (1 year)
Kristen Walker, MD 1,243 Surgical Critical Care Fellowship at Memorial Health University Medical Center, Savannah, GA (1 year) then Cardiothoracic Surgery at University of Florida in Gainesville starting in August 2020
Audrey Butcher, MD 998 Hospital employed group at Rutland Regional Medical Center, Rutland, VT
Vishwanath Danthuluri, MD 1,027 Minimally invasive and Bariatric Surgery Fellowship in San Antonio, Texas (Affiliated with the UT Health system)(1 year)
David Juan, MD 1,210 Colorectal Fellowship at LSU in Shreveport, LA (1 year)
Joseph Spaniol, MD 1,130 Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery Fellowship at Temple University in Philadelphia, PA (3 years)
Brett Tracy, MD 1,036 Trauma Surgery & Critical Care Fellowship at Emory University at Grady Hospital in Atlanta, GA (2 years
John Allen, MD 1,010 Minimally Invasive Surgical Fellowship at University of South Carolina -Greenville, SC (1 year)
Katherine Baysinger, MD 1,100 Colorectal Fellowship at University of Texas in Houston, TX (1 year)
Katherine McBride, MD 1,030 Trauma/Critical Care Fellowship at East Carolina University in Greenville, NC (2 years)
Issa Mirmehdi, MD 1,137 Vascular Fellowship at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) in Richmond, VA (2 years)
Davis Moon, MD 1,103 Vascular Fellowship at Ochsner Clinic in New Orleans, LA (2 years)